Creativity

/Creativity

FIVE KEYS TO TAP INTO YOUR HIDDEN CREATIVITY

When George* came to see me, he said he felt caught between two masters, his career and his passion. Can you relate?   Asked why his career wasn’t his passion, George said his job as a business manager for a high-end establishment paid super well though the hours were long and his clientage was hard to deal with sometimes. As for what he believed was his true passion, he said he had put it on the back burner (for many years) because he thought he was ‘out of’ creative ideas and had ‘exhausted’ all his resources. Listening to him talk, it was clear to me George had failed to tap into his hidden creativity.   Have you ever been in a situation where you felt like you could do much better?   After his work shift, George confessed he often went out. He said he needed to unwind at night

THE FIVE KEYS TO IGNITING YOUR PASSION AND CLOSE MORE SALES

Passion is infectious across sales teams and to customers.  Result: more sales closed.   When Claude* came to see me, she believed that if she tried ‘hard’ enough and kept working till she dropped exhausted every night, then she ‘knew’ what passion was and was therefore ‘living’ it.   But when I asked her how this ‘passion’ of hers was showing up in her business results, she shyly confessed she was struggling at bringing new customers in. She even said she had been living from pay cheque to pay cheque lately. This told me how Claude had done what so many of us do, falsely equate passion with sheer will.   Through my talking with her, I found out Claude was considering skipping ship; she was considering moving to a competitor of her current employer. When asked why, she said she felt like she wasn’t growing as a person and

THE FIVE MYTHS ABOUT CREATIVITY IN THE BUSINESS WORLD

“Who do you consider as being creative?” I asked my potential client, Kravis*, who sat in front of me clothed in a navy blue pinstriped suit, matching blue tie, crisply ironed white shirt, and bull-bear Tiffany cufflinks. Crossing his hands in front of me, Kravis leaned forward and affirmed, “Look Anne, there’s no money in arts.” To me, the mere fact Kravis had immediately associated creativity to arts told me how he seemed to falsely believe that creativity is a realm only accessible in arts. But is true? Is it always true that creativity can only be found in arts?   Here are five myths about creativity in the business world.   Myth #1. Only singers and painters are creative?  In a 2011 study (1) performed by the University of Hong Kong, researchers wanted to determine who Chinese and German undergraduates believed were the best national and international creators. Their study showed

THREE WAYS YOU ARE ALREADY CREATIVE AND DID NOT KNOW IT

“I want to be creative!” blurted Mark* when he came to see me. Mark is a professional in his early thirties who feels there is more life than just sitting at a desk drawing rows and columns of numbers for his boss. When I replied that he is indeed creative, he looked at me, mouth open.   Like many other professionals perhaps, Mark had not realized yet how his level of critical thinking marries well with his creativity. I understand… like many of us, he had been taught from a young age that logic and creativity apparently make poor bed fellows. But is true? Is it always true that critical thinking and creativity can never rally for the same cause?   Let’s find out…   When it comes to….   #1: PROPORTIONALITY The great painter Leonardo Da Vinci and other Renaissance masters are known to have used the mathematical ratio

THREE WAYS IGNORING YOUR CREATIVITY IS BLOCKING YOUR DREAM JOB

When Joy* came to see me, she was dressed in black from head to toe, not because she found that colour trendy, but because, as she said, she thought it camouflaged her body fat. Looking at the ground as she said these words, she retreated deeply into her seat. This behaviour of hers told me a lot about Joy, how her life seemed to lack the vibrant colours of creativity.    Through my talking with her, I found out she did not like her job and wanted a new position because she felt unseen and unheard by upper management. When she wrote her boss yet another memo about an ongoing problem in her division, she claimed her words landed on deaf ears. Ever been in that situation?   When I asked her if she had provided her boss with a viable solution to this ongoing problem, she quietly said no,